About Us

WHAT WE DO AND WHY WE DO IT

Nasc is the Irish word for "link". Nasc works to link migrants and ethnic minorities to their rights through protecting human rights, promoting integration and campaigning for change. Our mission is to enable migrants and ethnic minorities to access justice and human rights and work to achieve a just, inclusive and equal society. Nasc works for an inclusive society based on the principles of human rights, social justice and equality.

CONNECT COMMUNITIES

Nasc Ireland

INTEGRATION / TACKLING RACISM & DISCRIMINATION

Nasc is the lead agency in Cork charged with designing and implementing the Cork City Integration Strategy. We are working to achieve a shared vision of Cork as a city that values diversity and promotes equality of opportunity for all migrants and their families. We believe that migrants can contribute to our economic recovery. We also work with the Gardai to tackle racism and discrimination both locally and nationally. "Immigration is a permanent and positive reality in Ireland today." Fiona Finn CEO Nasc

REUNITE FAMILIES

Nasc Ireland

FATIMA'S STORY

Fatima is a mother of five. She was separated from her family during the war in Somalia. Fatima fled to Ireland and attained refugee status. With support from Nasc, UNHCR Ireland traced her family to the Dahab Refugee Camp in Kenya which was experiencing a severe famine. Each night Fatima's family sent her a missed call-this was their only way of telling her that they lived through the night. Through the work of Nasc and UNHCR Ireland Fatima was able to reunite with her children and sister. These applications usually take two to three years but we were able to secure permission for Fatima within six months. "The help you at Nasc give people is immeasurable. It really makes a huge difference to people's lives. Knowledge is power and we feel very powerless. That is why Nasc is so great, it gives some power back to the people." Fatima from Somalia

CAMPAIGN FOR CHANGE

Nasc Ireland

MR AL BASARI'S STORY

Mr Al Basari is an artist and meteorologist. He fled the war in Iraq as an elderly gentleman and sought refuge in Ireland. Mr Al Basari and many like him spent many years waiting for citizenship. One of Nasc's major focuses in recent years was co-leading a campaign to reform the torturously long and inefficient naturalisation process. Change was finally achieved last year when the current minister announced a radical overhaul of the system. It was Mr Al Basari's dream to become a citizen of Ireland before he died. We are delighted to report that he was conferred at a formal cere-mony in Cork last December. "Nasc is caring for us from the first day we arrived Ireland. It is really a kind of mother for all refugees." Mr Al Basri from Iraq